Model Engine Company of America

The main cause of an engine dying half way through the flight is usually a pin hole in the fuel line inside the tank.

The tear resistance of silicon tubing is very low and it's not uncommon to develop a hole where the fuel line is assembled over the edges of brass tubing. If the engine runs well on the first half of tank and then quits, it's almost always caused by a hole in the pick up line inside the tank.

When the fuel level is higher than the hole in the pick up tube in the tank the engine will draw fuel through the pick up tube and the pin hole.

When the fuel level drops below the pin hole the engine will start to draw air. This results in the fuel mixture leaning out and the engine dying.

 

A tell tale sign of this are bubbles in the fuel line while the engine is running with a low level of fuel in the tank.
See also cause of erratic running
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